Reaching students with ‘ARMS’


Buckeye Hills to offer robotics manufacturing program

By Morgan McKinniss - mmckinniss@aimmediamidwest.com



FANUC robotic arms are used as a standard in automated manufacturing. The ARMS program at BHCC has two they have arranged for students to operate and program to move rings about through a process, which start on this conveyor belt with sensors to communicate with the robots.

FANUC robotic arms are used as a standard in automated manufacturing. The ARMS program at BHCC has two they have arranged for students to operate and program to move rings about through a process, which start on this conveyor belt with sensors to communicate with the robots.


Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Instructor Chip Collins for the adult Industrial Maintenance program uses this controller to start and program the FANUC robotic arms, teaching students how to repair and maintain them.


Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Here the arm has picked up a metal ring from the conveyor belt and is moving it to the first process station in the forefront, where the arm will wait for further instructions.


Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Students will also learn to program Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) automated machine tooling as part of the ARMS program. Many manufacturers use CNC machines and the operation and maintenance is critical for automated manufacturing.


Morgan McKinniss|OVP

RIO GRANDE — Buckeye Hills Career Center is set to offer a new program in the fall, Advanced Robotics Manufacturing Systems (ARMS).

ARMS will be offered to high school students that will focus on robotics, programmable logic controllers (PLC), CNC machining, welding, hydraulics, and pneumatics.

“In the modern workplace today, everybody competes against each other. Coorporate offices send out diagrams (of parts) to everybody, we figure out what it takes to build that part, and they choose who gets the job according to cost,” said Chip Collins, instructor of the adult Industrial Maintenance program. “Instead of having to pay a person to do a lot of the mundane jobs, a robot can do that. They can lower the per-part cost by doing away with manpower wages. The robot will cost you $60,000 but in a couple of years it’s paid for. There’s no health insurance that costs you about $20,000 a year, and they don’t call in sick very often.”

Collins explained that more industries are moving towards robotics in their manufacturing processes, and BHCC plans to train students to be able to maintain and repair those machines. According to Collins, a typical FANUC robot will operate 50,000 hours between faults and repair time.

“In 1978 I left here on a Thursday, stopped at Merrillat that Friday, and went to work the following Monday. I worked there 18 years, then came back to work here. Because of my career, which has been right here in this room, I’ve never been without a job,” said Collins.

“That’s what we are trying to do with this high school program, is to create a student and employee who can work in any plant or any kind of industrial setting, that they have the skills to be able to fix robots, PLC’s, if they need somebody to weld they can do it, if they need somebody to fix electrical or wiring they can do it too,” said Tim Updike, career-technical supervisor.

Students who complete the program will have the chance to earn multiple certifications including; FANUC robotics, NCCER core, NCCER 1, welding, and other safety certifications that BHCC students have the chance to earn.

The program will start in the fall of 2018 for high school students. Area sophomores will have the chance to visit Buckeye Hills Career Center This Thursday to tour the facility and learn about all of the programs available. To learn more about BHCC and their available programs, visit buckeyehills.net as well as future editions of the Gallipolis Daily Tribune featuring more programs offered by the center.

FANUC robotic arms are used as a standard in automated manufacturing. The ARMS program at BHCC has two they have arranged for students to operate and program to move rings about through a process, which start on this conveyor belt with sensors to communicate with the robots.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/01/web1_DSC_0515.jpgFANUC robotic arms are used as a standard in automated manufacturing. The ARMS program at BHCC has two they have arranged for students to operate and program to move rings about through a process, which start on this conveyor belt with sensors to communicate with the robots. Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Instructor Chip Collins for the adult Industrial Maintenance program uses this controller to start and program the FANUC robotic arms, teaching students how to repair and maintain them.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/01/web1_DSC_0517.jpgInstructor Chip Collins for the adult Industrial Maintenance program uses this controller to start and program the FANUC robotic arms, teaching students how to repair and maintain them. Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Here the arm has picked up a metal ring from the conveyor belt and is moving it to the first process station in the forefront, where the arm will wait for further instructions.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/01/web1_DSC_0521.jpgHere the arm has picked up a metal ring from the conveyor belt and is moving it to the first process station in the forefront, where the arm will wait for further instructions. Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Students will also learn to program Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) automated machine tooling as part of the ARMS program. Many manufacturers use CNC machines and the operation and maintenance is critical for automated manufacturing.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/01/web1_DSC_0527.jpgStudents will also learn to program Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) automated machine tooling as part of the ARMS program. Many manufacturers use CNC machines and the operation and maintenance is critical for automated manufacturing. Morgan McKinniss|OVP
Buckeye Hills to offer robotics manufacturing program

By Morgan McKinniss

mmckinniss@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Morgan McKinniss at 740-446-2342 ext 2108.

Reach Morgan McKinniss at 740-446-2342 ext 2108.