Ask good questions


By Pastor Ron Branch



Branch

Branch


I tend to think that if I had the privilege of attending presidential news briefings, I would prepare myself to ask meaningful questions. But, from what I have seen from the recent televised briefings with President Trump, some of the attending reporters do not have in mind to ask good questions. Several have asked the most stupid questions imaginable. These have asked questions with the purposeful intent of accusation. These have done so out of hatred, and with the hope of stirring up strife.

It absolutely disgusts me. You see, a decent question is important for others to consider. A good honest question could be helpful to me as a common man trying to not get infected with this virulent COVID-19 disease. A good thoughtful question from these could evoke timely information about what I need to do to keep my family safe. A good question from these could be helpful in shedding fresh light on procedure and shaping proper perspective about our currently diseased environment.

But, no-o-o-o…they have got to ask those stupid, spiteful questions that smack of certain political agendas and radical new deal ideologies. Instead of expressing care and concern for others through meaningful questions, they show their bias and arrogance. Like I said—-it absolutely disgusts me.

People treat God the same way by asking pointless and inane questions. They ask the same useless questions that have been repeated from generation to generation, like, “If God is good, why does He permit evil to exist in this world?” They ask the same useless questions about God, like, “Does God really exist?” They ask the same useless questions that provide self pity, like, “What did I ever do to deserve this?” And, then, they ask the same type of useless questions just to make fun of God.

Once I visited a certain person in the hospital. Several of the person’s family members were there. Eventually, the conversation turned to Bible-related concerns. But, one them interrupted with, “Preacher, let me ask you a question.” Then, with a snide voice and a sneer on their face, they asked, “Preacher, tell me—-did Adam and Eve have belly buttons?” It made everyone laugh, except for me, because I knew what he was trying to do.

God says that such questions “darkens counsel by words without knowledge.”

If you have questions for God or about God, why not ask good questions. Some good questions might be:

1. What is God’s will for my life? That is a good question to ask because it is readily addressed in the Bible. It is a good question to ask because God answers it with direction. It is a good question to ask because it gives purpose and meaning to living.

2. How can I be saved? The answer for that question always involves believing in Jesus Christ, His death and resurrection. It is a good question to ask because a person’s eternity is on the line about it.

3. Can I be forgiven for the sins I have committed? The answer to that question is always “Yes!” The Scripture says, “Who is a God like unto thee that pardons iniquity…He retains not His anger forever, for He delights in mercy…and you will cast all their sins into the depths of the sea.”

4. How can I have more faith? That is a good question to ask because God wants us to be people strong in faith. People of faith absolutely trust in God and rely on God. People of faith make consistent and confident disciples of Jesus Christ.

5. Is God Sovereign? That is a good question to ask and believe because it leads to a sense of peace and acceptance of what God allows to transpire. It takes a lot of stress out of our lives to know that God is the only one who can bring about proper resolution to our concerns.

In the meantime, I answered the person who asked the belly button question with, “It does not matter. But, it does matter that you get right with God. Will you get right with God now?” Without offering an answer, they got up and walked out.

Branch
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By Pastor Ron Branch

Pastor Ron Branch lives in Mason County and is pastor of Hope Baptist Church, Middleport, Ohio. Viewpoints expressed in the article are the work of the author.

Pastor Ron Branch lives in Mason County and is pastor of Hope Baptist Church, Middleport, Ohio. Viewpoints expressed in the article are the work of the author.