Holzer receives funds for low-dose CT Scan


Staff Report



Pictured from left, Holzer Low-Dose CT Staff Sarah Harrison, DTC-Main CT Tech, Robin Blagg, Lead CT Tech, and Nicole Koren, Program Coordinator. (Holzer | Courtesy)

Pictured from left, Holzer Low-Dose CT Staff Sarah Harrison, DTC-Main CT Tech, Robin Blagg, Lead CT Tech, and Nicole Koren, Program Coordinator. (Holzer | Courtesy)


GALLIPOLIS — Finding early signs of lung cancer was once next to impossible, however, studies are proving that screening with low-dose CT scans may identify the beginnings of disease in high-risk patients.

Holzer recently announced its offering this type of screening at its Athens and Gallipolis locations and has received a grant from Whedon Cancer Detection Foundation to provide a limited number of free screenings to those who qualify.

According to a press release from Holzer Health System, it is designated as a Lung Cancer Screening Center by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Holzer began its Low-Dose CT Scan Program on Sept. 1, 2015 and to date has completed over 1,415 studies. In addition, a number of patients have not been able to have the scan due to financial constraints. By obtaining these grant funds, Holzer is able to offer a limited number of screenings for individuals who qualify.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. The American Cancer Society’s estimates approximately 228,820 new cases diagnosed and 135,720 deaths from lung cancer in 2020. An annual Low-dose CT Screening Test for individuals at high risk has the potential to dramatically improve lung cancer survival rates by finding the disease at an early treatable stage. It is estimated that if everyone who is at high risk is screened, there will be a 14 percent reduction in lung cancer deaths in the United States.

Every person scheduled for the screening will meet with Holzer’s Program Coordinator who will answer questions and facilitate any follow up necessary. She will communicate with the referring physician and the Holzer Lung Team to ensure comprehensive care.

“Considering the large number of smokers in the Southern Ohio, we are pleased to be able to offer this service. We have already detected several lung cancers at stages where they are treatable. We are excited about the prospect of saving additional lives with this quick, simple procedure,” stated Philip Long, MD, radiologist. “We are thankful to all of our staff for their efforts to make this process easy for our patients and expedite follow-up with physicians in other specialized areas if necessary.”

Individuals who are eligible to receive the low-dose CT scan include patients age 55-77 and are smokers or who have quit within the last 15 years with a smoking history of at least 30 pack-years. Pack-years are calculated by multiplying the average number of packs of cigarettes a person smokes per day by the number of years a person has smoked.

“We are excited that Whedon Cancer Detections Foundation agreed to fund our request to enhance the Holzer Health System Low-Dose CT Scan Program for the fourth year in a row,” Chris Thomas, director of Imaging Services, Holzer Health System. “As a result, it has afforded us the opportunity to offer this proven lifesaving early detection scan to patients who otherwise might not receive it. This is just another example of the great things happening here at Holzer to benefit our patients.”

For more information, call 740-441-3905 or email info@holzer.org.

Information provided by Holzer Health System.

Pictured from left, Holzer Low-Dose CT Staff Sarah Harrison, DTC-Main CT Tech, Robin Blagg, Lead CT Tech, and Nicole Koren, Program Coordinator. (Holzer | Courtesy)
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2020/06/web1_6.11-CT.jpgPictured from left, Holzer Low-Dose CT Staff Sarah Harrison, DTC-Main CT Tech, Robin Blagg, Lead CT Tech, and Nicole Koren, Program Coordinator. (Holzer | Courtesy)

Staff Report