Christmas at Fort Randolph


Holidays on the frontier

By Kayla Hawthorne - khawthorne@aimmediamidwest.com



Volunteers on the Fort Randolph Committee are pictured in front of the tavern.

Volunteers on the Fort Randolph Committee are pictured in front of the tavern.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

The scale replica of Fort Randolph has block houses in the front corners of the fort and a blacksmith shop, pictured in the right.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Pictured is the bake oven, which was used to bake breads, pies and cakes at Fort Randolph.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

A view of Fort Randolph from one of the block houses.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Pictured is one of the cabins that housed soldiers.


Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

POINT PLEASANT — Christmas on the Frontier was recently held at Fort Randolph in Krodel Park.

The Christmas event allows the public to see the fort and experience some Christmas customs and talk with reenactors.

Fort Randolph is a historically accurate reproduction of the original fort from the American Revolutionary War. According to information provided by The Fort Randolph Committee, the fort was used from 1776-1779 as an outpost for the colonies and to prevent attacks from the British and their Native American allies. Fort Randolph was eventually burned to the ground by Native Americans.

The original fort stood where the downtown area of Point Pleasant is now. At Krodel Park, the replica was built in 1974 and displays buildings and cabins. There are two blockhouses, which were used as a secure place to defend the fort from an attack. Several cabins are available for viewing to see what living quarters were like on the fort. The fort also houses a blacksmith shop and woodworking cabin. An underground powder magazine is in the middle of the fort and was used to store gunpowder — keeping it and the fort safe. The committee also has a trading post and a building with modern amenities.

Fort Randolph is open every weekend from the third weekend in May through Labor Day. The committee hosts several events throughout the year, including the Siege of Fort Randolph, which is where Chief Cornstalk is killed.

Volunteers on the Fort Randolph Committee are pictured in front of the tavern.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2019/12/web1_thumbnail_DSC_0631.jpgVolunteers on the Fort Randolph Committee are pictured in front of the tavern. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

The scale replica of Fort Randolph has block houses in the front corners of the fort and a blacksmith shop, pictured in the right.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2019/12/web1_thumbnail_DSC_0634.jpgThe scale replica of Fort Randolph has block houses in the front corners of the fort and a blacksmith shop, pictured in the right. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Pictured is the bake oven, which was used to bake breads, pies and cakes at Fort Randolph.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2019/12/web1_thumbnail_DSC_0639.jpgPictured is the bake oven, which was used to bake breads, pies and cakes at Fort Randolph. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

A view of Fort Randolph from one of the block houses.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2019/12/web1_thumbnail_DSC_0645.jpgA view of Fort Randolph from one of the block houses. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy

Pictured is one of the cabins that housed soldiers.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2019/12/web1_thumbnail_DSC_0647.jpgPictured is one of the cabins that housed soldiers. Kayla Hawthorne | Courtesy
Holidays on the frontier

By Kayla Hawthorne

khawthorne@aimmediamidwest.com

Kayla Hawthorne is a staff writer for Ohio Valley Publishing. Reach her at (304) 675-1333, extension 1992.

Kayla Hawthorne is a staff writer for Ohio Valley Publishing. Reach her at (304) 675-1333, extension 1992.