Harvest Moon Pow Wow returns


The Harvest Moon Pow Wow returned to Gallipolis City Park this past weekend with dancing, drumming and a celebration of Native American heritage and culture. The event, which was free and open to the public, included the popular “candy dance” where area children danced into the circle to receive a treat, as well as various other educational activities. Pictured are Native Americans dancing in the circle as the festivities came to a close Monday afternoon.

The Harvest Moon Pow Wow returned to Gallipolis City Park this past weekend with dancing, drumming and a celebration of Native American heritage and culture. The event, which was free and open to the public, included the popular “candy dance” where area children danced into the circle to receive a treat, as well as various other educational activities. Pictured are Native Americans dancing in the circle as the festivities came to a close Monday afternoon.


Beth Sergent | OVP

The Harvest Moon Pow Wow returned to Gallipolis City Park this past weekend with dancing, drumming and a celebration of Native American heritage and culture. The event, which was free and open to the public, included the popular “candy dance” where area children danced into the circle to receive a treat, as well as various other educational activities. Pictured are Native Americans dancing in the circle as the festivities came to a close Monday afternoon.

The Harvest Moon Pow Wow returned to Gallipolis City Park this past weekend with dancing, drumming and a celebration of Native American heritage and culture. The event, which was free and open to the public, included the popular “candy dance” where area children danced into the circle to receive a treat, as well as various other educational activities. Pictured are Native Americans dancing in the circle as the festivities came to a close Monday afternoon.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2019/09/web1_PowWow.jpgThe Harvest Moon Pow Wow returned to Gallipolis City Park this past weekend with dancing, drumming and a celebration of Native American heritage and culture. The event, which was free and open to the public, included the popular “candy dance” where area children danced into the circle to receive a treat, as well as various other educational activities. Pictured are Native Americans dancing in the circle as the festivities came to a close Monday afternoon. Beth Sergent | OVP