COSI in Gallia County


Bringing science to the students

By Morgan McKinniss - mmckinniss@aimmediamidwest.com



Volunteers from the University of Rio Grande came to teach students about energy. Here, one second grade student is learning about gravity and mass.

Volunteers from the University of Rio Grande came to teach students about energy. Here, one second grade student is learning about gravity and mass.


Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Second grade students all watch closely as a chain reaction, which utilizes multiple forms of energy, goes through its various steps.


Morgan McKinniss|OVP

RIO GRANDE — Rio Grande Elementary (RGE) students had the opportunity to experience the Center of Science and Industry (COSI) in their school Thursday.

COSI brought its “COSI on wheels” exhibit to RGE teaching students about energy through hands-on exhibits.

“We learned about energy today, starting off with a whole school assembly and now they are getting a more hands on experience with hands on stations around the room so they are learning about energy while doing activities,” said Quincey Chambers, an educator with COSI.

COSI on wheels is a part of the education department at COSI and travels throughout Ohio doing outreach and educational programs. Chambers gave a lesson about energy to the whole school and then each grade was invited back to the gymnasium individually to spend time at each of the stations, which ranged from electricity and making motors and lights work with circuits, to physics and momentum with steel balls on tracks.

“Energy is involved with so many things around us, during the assembly we explained how energy makes things move and light up or make noises and that’s everything. It’s giving them a better understanding of what’s going on around them,” said Chambers.

One student worked on building a lamp with his friends to learn how electricity provides light.

“Making the ramp was my favorite, but it’s not working out very good. Me and my friends are still trying to figure how we can get it to work,” said Second Grader Cooper Denney.

The whole event is made possible through volunteers from University of Rio Grande’s Science Methods Course, where students are taught to teach science in the Bunce School of Education. In that class, students are required to have field experience, which they earn by learning the hands-on stations and work with students teaching them about energy.

“We started this about seven years ago when I first came here. It’s more to introduce the sciences, it’s a fun way to get the kids introduced to science and COSI,” said Miranda Fortner, science teacher. “A lot of our kids never get to go to COSI, so we bring this here so they can have that opportunity.”

The day costs about $1,000, which the PTO and Academic Boosters cover.

“It’s fun, that’s why we do it. It’s hands on, we don’t get to do a lot of hands on or take many field trips anymore. To bring that hands on here, to where most kids would never have a chance to go, is a big deal,” said Fortner.

Volunteers from the University of Rio Grande came to teach students about energy. Here, one second grade student is learning about gravity and mass.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/03/web1_DSC_0317.jpgVolunteers from the University of Rio Grande came to teach students about energy. Here, one second grade student is learning about gravity and mass. Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Second grade students all watch closely as a chain reaction, which utilizes multiple forms of energy, goes through its various steps.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/03/web1_DSC_0298.jpgSecond grade students all watch closely as a chain reaction, which utilizes multiple forms of energy, goes through its various steps. Morgan McKinniss|OVP
Bringing science to the students

By Morgan McKinniss

mmckinniss@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Morgan McKinniss at 740-446-2342 ext 2108.

Reach Morgan McKinniss at 740-446-2342 ext 2108.