Beta Alpha members hear dyslexia presentation


Kathy Whaley, an Orton-Gillingham Practitioner and serves as Dyslexia Interventionist at Catalyst4Learning and adjunct at the University of Rio Grande, gives presentation on dyslexia.

Kathy Whaley, an Orton-Gillingham Practitioner and serves as Dyslexia Interventionist at Catalyst4Learning and adjunct at the University of Rio Grande, gives presentation on dyslexia.


Kathy Whaley spoke to the Beta Alpha Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma during the group’s recent meeting.


GALLIPOLIS — The Beta Alpha Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma recently met at the Holzer Health Center in The East Family Community Room for their November meeting. Fourteen members and guest speaker, Kathy Whaley were in attendance. The evening meal was provided by the planning committee.

President Donna DeWitt introduced the guest speaker, Kathy Whaley. Kathy worked in the Gallipolis City Schools as an Intervention Specialist and works at the University of Rio Grande as an adjunct professor. She is also an Orton-Gillingham Practitioner and serves as Dyslexia Interventionist at Catalyst4Learning. Her talk entailed the study of dyslexia and techniques of how its diagnosed and treated. Kathy is very passionate about her work in understanding, diagnosing, and finding ways to deal with this specific learning disability. As she shared in her presentation, “The more we understand, the more we can intervene.”

In her power point presentation Kathy shared that dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurobiological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction.” (International Dyslexia Association)

The exact causes of dyslexia are still not clear. Brain imagery studies show differences in the way the brain of a person with dyslexia develops and functions. Most people with dyslexia have been found to have problems with identifying the separate speech sounds within a word and/or learning how letters represent those sounds. Dyslexia is not due to either lack of intelligence or a desire to learn.

Dyslexia is a lifelong condition. With proper help, many people with dyslexia can learn to read and write well. Early identification is critical to help individuals with dyslexia achieve in school and in life.

Most people with dyslexia need help from a teacher, tutor or therapist specifically trained in using a multi-sensory, structured language approach. This method should be direct, explicit, and systematic focusing on the different layers of language such as phonology, sound-symbol association, syllable instruction, morphology, syntax, and semantics.

Teaching reading using methods that align with the Science of Reading will minimize the effects of dyslexia.

The presentation was followed by a business meeting. Door prizes were won by Beth James, Cathy Greenleaf, Gail Belville, and Gwen Daniels. The next meeting will be Saturday, February 5th at 10:30 a.m. at the Bob Evans Event Barn.

Submitted by Debbie Rhodes.

Kathy Whaley, an Orton-Gillingham Practitioner and serves as Dyslexia Interventionist at Catalyst4Learning and adjunct at the University of Rio Grande, gives presentation on dyslexia.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2021/12/web1_4D1DE4BEE3F64C2184CEB97AAA81DF09.jpgKathy Whaley, an Orton-Gillingham Practitioner and serves as Dyslexia Interventionist at Catalyst4Learning and adjunct at the University of Rio Grande, gives presentation on dyslexia.

Kathy Whaley spoke to the Beta Alpha Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma during the group’s recent meeting.
https://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2021/12/web1_69D3E2E0EE3044AFA4207F99B5534459.jpgKathy Whaley spoke to the Beta Alpha Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma during the group’s recent meeting.