Building for tomorrow


By Morgan McKinniss - mmckinniss@aimmediamidwest.com



Instructor Kyle Deel (left) teaches a Building and Grounds Maintenance student Shae Beaty (right) how to operate a stand on lawn mower.

Instructor Kyle Deel (left) teaches a Building and Grounds Maintenance student Shae Beaty (right) how to operate a stand on lawn mower.


Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Roby Harrison muds the intersection of two drywall panels to hide the seam, a necessary practice in finishing the inside of a home. After the material dries it is then sanded down to a smooth finish.


Morgan McKinniss|OVP

RIO GRANDE — In Gallia County, nearly every person lives or works in a building. Buildings, as with all material things, require care and maintenance and sometimes repairs. As Buckeye Hills Career Center seeks to train students for work that is readily available and necessary in our area, the Construction Trades Academy educates students to build, maintain, and repair a wide variety of buildings and their systems.

The building trades program teaches students how to work in the construction field, from foundations to roofing and everything in between. They earn real world experience constructing a modular home in the program to learn how to lay foundations, build walls, frame roofs, full wiring, and to use a variety of hand and power tools. Students also learn to read blueprints, survey land, and about material and job site safety.

“We learn everything from masonry to roofing,we teach kids to work on all aspects of residential housing,” said Instructor Duane Bing.

Students in the building trades program have the opportunity to be certified nationally in carpentry and building trades through the National Center for Construction Education and Research as well as Occupational Safety and Heath Administration.

“I like to build things, I want to start my own construction business someday,” said student Derek Murray.

The other major construction program is the Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, Plumbing, and Electrical systems and repair (HVAC). Here students learn to install, repair, and service systems commonly found in homes and businesses. Students are prepared for work in a number of different fields upon graduation; plumbing, electrical, and contract work installing HVAC systems.

“There are a lot of good job opportunities, I can go anywhere in America and work,” said Derek Miller.

Students in the Construction Trades Academy can also enter the Building and Grounds Maintenance program, where they can learn skills ranging from welding and woodwork to gardening and soil conservation. The program is intended to train students to be effective handymen, capable of making basic repairs to common systems and household problems.

“Number one is safety. After that we do a lot of landscaping and maintenance skills, then it’s a lot of repair skills, woodworking as well, a lot of everyday maintenance really,” said Instructor Kyle Deel. “The biggest selling point is, you’re taught to be a jack of all trades.”

Students maintain the grounds and facilities at the school for most of the year, which included installing a 250 foot drain to move ground water out from the building. They did this using basic tools they have in their lab.

“I like it because you get outside and do more landscaping stuff. My favorite part has been the garden and planting, I’m going to try and find a landscaping job after high school,” said Shae Batey.

As with all programs at Buckeye Hills Career Center, visit their website at buckeyehills.net or call them at 740-245-5334 to learn more.

Instructor Kyle Deel (left) teaches a Building and Grounds Maintenance student Shae Beaty (right) how to operate a stand on lawn mower.
http://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/02/web1_20180221_102036.jpgInstructor Kyle Deel (left) teaches a Building and Grounds Maintenance student Shae Beaty (right) how to operate a stand on lawn mower. Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Roby Harrison muds the intersection of two drywall panels to hide the seam, a necessary practice in finishing the inside of a home. After the material dries it is then sanded down to a smooth finish.
http://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/02/web1_DSC_0512.jpgRoby Harrison muds the intersection of two drywall panels to hide the seam, a necessary practice in finishing the inside of a home. After the material dries it is then sanded down to a smooth finish. Morgan McKinniss|OVP

By Morgan McKinniss

mmckinniss@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Morgan McKinniss at 740-446-2342 ext 2108.

Reach Morgan McKinniss at 740-446-2342 ext 2108.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU