Students look to the stars


BIDWELL — Freshman at River Valley High School’s Orientation had a special opportunity Monday.

About 2:30 p.m. a solar eclipse crested in the afternoon sky. Students were in the process of meeting other students and preparing for the upcoming school year when they were provided safe eclipse viewing glasses and taken outside to witness the phenomenon.

While the path of totality crossed south of Gallia County, observers were still able to witness substantial blockage of the sun. Will Edgar is a mentor to the incoming freshman and was present for the eclipse as well.

“It’s pretty cool to see this once in a lifetime experience,” said Edgar.

Wyatt Coon is an incoming freshman that got to experience the solar event.

“It was actually a pretty cool experience, to look at the sun in that state. You don’t get to do it very much,” stated Coon. “It’s special, it doesn’t come around every day.”

TR Edwards, principal at RVHS was glad for the event taking place during Freshman Foundations.

“This is a real, spontaneous teachable moment. Anytime we have that, we try and take advantage of that,” said Edwards.

He explained that taking advantage of unique learning opportunities like this is a part of learning at River Valley. Last year they had an Ohio Supreme Court Justice on hand to talk to the students.

Seth Bowman decided to take a different approach to view the eclipse, opting for an empty cheerio box instead of glasses.

“I think it would be cool to use modern things in your household to look at it (the eclipse) instead of buying fancy glasses,” said Bowman. He used a plan he found on the internet to construct his looking box using aluminum foil, white paper, and scissors.

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Seth Bowman, an incoming freshman made a looking box. A pinhole in the foil allows some light into the box, where an outline of the eclipse can be seen inside the box. The foil is on the top right of the box.
http://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2017/08/web1_DSC_06122017821163721985.jpgSeth Bowman, an incoming freshman made a looking box. A pinhole in the foil allows some light into the box, where an outline of the eclipse can be seen inside the box. The foil is on the top right of the box. Morgan McKinniss|OVP

The solar eclipse peaked around 2:30 p.m. blocking about 85 percent of the sun. At this level, special glasses were still needed to witness the eclipse.
http://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2017/08/web1_DSC_0661E2017821163727596.jpgThe solar eclipse peaked around 2:30 p.m. blocking about 85 percent of the sun. At this level, special glasses were still needed to witness the eclipse. Morgan McKinniss|OVP

Freshman look to the stars, or at least our star to see the moon pass in front of it.
http://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2017/08/web1_DSC_06062017821163730343.jpgFreshman look to the stars, or at least our star to see the moon pass in front of it. Morgan McKinniss|OVP
Eclipse provides ‘teachable moment’

By Morgan McKinniss

mmckinniss@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Morgan McKinniss at 740-446-2342 ext 2108.