Last updated: October 28. 2013 8:13PM - 591 Views
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GALLIPOLIS — Who’s your idol? Mariano Rivera? Adele? Steve Jobs?


The Ohio Valley Symphony continues its season Nov. 2 with one of the most popular masterpieces of the 19th century — Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 — and a violin concerto by his idol, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. “Magical Mozart” comes to the stage of the historic Ariel-Ann Carson Dater Performing Arts Centre in downtown Gallipolis.


Ray Fowler, founding music director of the OVS, conducts the 8 p.m. performance. Dynamic young violinist Elena Urioste is soloist in Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 5.


Tchaikovsky’s fifth symphony was written in 1888, just a few years after his greatest musical tribute to Mozart, the Mozartiana orchestral suite. It’s an emotional roller-coaster, starting with a motive the composer called “a complete resignation before fate” and ending with a triumphant march. Its lush melodies and heartfelt expression have made it an audience favorite from its first performance — and a showpiece for orchestras around the world.


Besides his music, Mozart was best known in his day as a pianist, but he was a good violinist, too. He wrote all five of his violin concertos in 1775, when he was a young man working in Salzburg. The last, No. 5, already shows the polished elegance that would characterize all his later masterpieces. Its finale includes a section inspired by the exotic culture of his day, the Ottoman Turks.


Mexican-American violinist Elena Urioste was recently selected as a BBC New Generation Artist and featured on the cover of “Symphony” magazine. Elena’s debut performances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra were praised for their “hypnotic delicacy,” “expressive poise” and “lyrical sensitivity.” Since first appearing with the Philadelphia Orchestra at age 13, she has made acclaimed debuts with major orchestras throughout the United States, including the Cleveland Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Boston Pops, Buffalo Philharmonic, and the Atlanta, Baltimore, Detroit, Pittsburgh, Richmond, and San Antonio symphony orchestras.


She’s a graduate of the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia and New York’s Juilliard School. Her media credits include appearances on the popular radio programs “From the Top” and “Performance Today,” on NBC’s “Today” show, and in the Emmy award-winning documentary “Breaking the Sound Barrier.” Her second CD — with pianist Christopher O’Riley and cellist Carter Brey — will be released this year.


Elena now plays on an Alessandro Gagliano violin, made in Naples around 1706, and a Pierre Simon bow, both on generous extended loan from the private collection of Dr. Charles E. King through the Stradivari Society of Chicago.


November’s “Magical Mozart” reflects the OVS mission to bring great music played by great artists to the Ohio Valley – all while making orchestral music easy to love. The public is also encouraged to attend OVS rehearsals for free at 7-10 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1, and 1-4 p.m. Nov. 2. Open rehearsals are a great way for young and old alike to become more familiar with symphonic music, and they offer a fascinating behind-the-scenes glimpse of what goes into preparing an orchestral performance.


The OVS offers another way to make a personal connection with the music. Thomas Consolo, OVS assistant conductor and program annotator, hosts a free pre-concert talk in the recently opened Ariel Chamber Theatre, just upstairs from the concert site. The casual get-together will put a more personal face on the night’s music and answer questions about the program, the OVS or the orchestral experience in general. The talk begins at 7:15 p.m. Nov. 2.


Tickets and more information are available at the Ariel-Ann Carson Dater Performing Arts Centre box office, 428 Second Ave., Gallipolis; by phone, (740) 446-2787 (ARTS); and through the OVS web site, www.ohiovalleysymphony.org.


Funding for The Ohio Valley Symphony is provided in part by the Ann Carson Dater Endowment. Further support is provided through the Ohio Arts Council, a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally and economically, with funding by the National Endowment for the Arts.

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