Looking back at crime stats


From Sheriff, Prosector and Common Pleas Court

Staff Report



The Gallia Court of Common Pleas started its drug court in June 2017. The court would make use of a drug called Vivitrol aimed at blocking opiate receptors as a treatment technique for opiate addicts.


File photo

GALLIPOLIS — The Gallia Sheriff’s Office, the Gallia Prosecutor’s Office and Gallia Common Pleas Court compiled information to reflect on the current state of Gallia’s fight against crime and its comparison to previous years.

According to a report created by the Gallia Sheriff and Prosecutor, search warrants filed in 2015 numbered at 69. Warrants filed in 2016 numbered at 109 and 160 in 2017. Property crimes investigated totaled 691 in 2015, 765 in 2016 and 514 in 2017. Crimes of violence investigated numbered at 370 in 2015, 381 in 2016 and 203 in 2017. Sexual-related offenses investigated included 29 in 2015, 41 in 2016 and 13 in 2017. Drug offenses investigated in 2015 numbered at 40, 35 in 2016 and 27 in 2017. Arson cases investigated all three years numbered at two each. Crimes resulting in death investigated were two in both 2015 and 2016 and five in 2017.

Gallia Grand Jury indictments returned in 2015 numbered at 198, 233 in 2016 and 312 in 2017.

Prison commitments in 2015 numbered at two first-degree felony sentencings, nine second-degree, 23 third-degree, 13 fourth-degree and 27 fifth-degree. In 2016, first-degree felony sentencings numbered at five, seven second-degree, 18 third-degree, 23 fourth-degree and 26 fifth-degree. In 2017, 10 first-degree felony sentencings were returned, 12 second-degree, 35 third-degree, 17 fourth-degree and 17 fifth-degree.

The Gallia County Common Pleas Court Probation Department enrolled 98 new probation cases in 2017. Of the 98 new cases, 74 were directly sentenced by the court to probation. Six offenders were granted judicial release and assigned to probation upon their release. Eighteen offenders were supervised through probation while they engaged in the statutory mechanism called “Intervention in Lieu of Conviction.”

The Gallia County Common Pleas Drug Court was established in June of 2017, when the Court was awarded formal certification of the program from The Supreme Court of Ohio. The certification recognizes that the program meets the State and Court standards for drug courts in Ohio.

The drug court is a program designed to emphasize treatment as an alternative to incarceration. The program provides, for certain offenders, the opportunity to engage in closely monitored rehabilitation instead of prison. The monitoring is done by the probation department.

The goals of the drug court include reducing substance use and related criminal activity, holding drug dependent offenders accountable for their actions and decisions, providing resources and support to assist the drug dependent offenders in the acquisition of skills necessary for the maintenance of sobriety and rewarding positive life changes while maintaining accountability for negative conduct.

Program participants enter an intensive four phase treatment program scheduled to last a minimum of one year. Participants attend counseling groups, 12-step meetings, individual counseling, and case management sessions. They also have regularly scheduled court appearances and provide random urine samples. In most cases, upon successful completion of treatment, the participant will graduate from the program and either be removed from probation or moved to a less restrictive term of probation.

The drug court currently supervises 16 offenders.

Commentary from county officials regarding the numbers presented will be included in an upcoming edition of the Gallipolis Daily Tribune.

The Gallia Court of Common Pleas started its drug court in June 2017. The court would make use of a drug called Vivitrol aimed at blocking opiate receptors as a treatment technique for opiate addicts.
http://www.mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/42/2018/01/web1_2.10-Drug-Court2.jpegThe Gallia Court of Common Pleas started its drug court in June 2017. The court would make use of a drug called Vivitrol aimed at blocking opiate receptors as a treatment technique for opiate addicts. File photo
From Sheriff, Prosector and Common Pleas Court

Staff Report

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